Bail Bonds Terminology: 24 Hour, Low Price, Cheap Bail Bondsman in Cleveland

Are you looking for a cheap bail bondsman in Cleveland? Need a bail bondsman that is open 24 hours? Wondering what's the difference between a bail bonds and a bail bondsman? Whether you need bail bonds in downtown Cleveland, a Cuyahoga County bail bondsman, a bail bondsman in Toledo, Columbus or anywhere nationwide, we've got you covered at ABC Bail Bonds. And we care. You could be looking for yourself or a loved one and might be a little freaked-out if this is your first experience in our marvelous criminal justice system - let us help. We've compiled a list of the questions we get most often on our bail bonds FAQs page, we have common terminology down below on this page, as well as the different types of bail on our Types of Bail page.  But why scroll through all our website content? Just call us. We have someone available 24 hours to check calls and web forms so call 216-696-4866 or fill out our online web form with your phone number and reason for contacting us and we'll get back to you.

There are a number of terms regarding bail and the bail bonds process that are not part of our normal vocabulary. It can be frustrating to understand what your options are and what the costs could be when it comes to posting bail for yourself or a loved one.  Below is a list of words you're likely to encounter throughout the bail process. Click the plus (+) icon  to open the definition for each word you are trying to understand. Call the team at ABC Bail Bonds at 216-696-4866 with any questions about the process, or fill out the contact form on this website.

Glossary of Bail Bonds Terms

Bail bond

A bail bond (aka surety bond) is a written promissory note submitted to the court by the bonding company for the full face amount of the bond. This is done to secure the release of an accused party. A bail bond ensures that the accused will appear to all future court dates and abide by any and all other conditions imposed on them by the court for the full duration of their case.

Bail contract/application

A bail contract outlines the relationship and obligations of the defendant, the court, the bail bond company, the surety insurance company behind the bond, and the indemnitors/signer of the bond.

Cash Bond

A cash bond is posted directly with the court by the signer. It is the total amount of the bail paid in cash. If all of the courts stipulations are met then up to 90% of the money may be returned to the signer.

BUYER BEWARE: Sometimes a court will apply bond money that was deposited with them to court costs, fines, fees etc. The court may or may not inform you of this.

Collateral

Collateral is supplied by the indemnitor and provides added financial security to ensure that the defendant appears in court when he or she is supposed to. Collateral can be in the form of anything of financial value that is legally pledged to back up the promise that the defendant will appear on his or her scheduled court dates.

Collateral is usually supplied by relatives and friends of the defendant and provides added financial security to ensure that the defendant appears in court when he or she is supposed to. 

Exoneration

A bond is exonerated when the defendant appears in court as scheduled. This means that neither the people who supplied collateral or the Bail Bonds Company has any further financial obligation to the court in reference to the defendant's case. It means the case is “over”.

Forfeiture

A bail Contract outlines the relationship and obligations of the defendant, the court, the bail bond company, the surety insurance company behind the bond, and the indemnitors/signer of the bond.

Hold or Holder

A hold is a want or warrant from a jurisdiction other than the one that the defendant is currently incarcerated in. Holds are placed when a defendant either has pending charges, failed to appear, have unpaid court costs, a probation violation, or it could also be a parole or federal hold.

Own Recognizance Bond, or ROR, (aka Personal Bond)

A release on your own recognizance (ROR), also known as an own recognizance (OR) or personal recognizance (PR), is a written promise signed by the defendant. A ROR bond, or personal bond, secures a defendants release from jail based on their word and signature, without any financial security. The defendant agrees that they will return back to court for future proceedings. Courts usually reserve this option for low level or first time offenders, as this is the least restrictive type of bond that can be set.

Personal Bond aka Own Recognizance Bond

A personal bond secures a defendants release from jail based on their word and signature, without any financial security. The defendant agrees that they will return back to court for future proceedings. Courts usually reserve this option for low level or first time offenders, as this is the least restrictive type of bond that can be set.

Premium

A "premium" is the amount paid to a Bail bonds company for the many services and financial risks assumed by the Bail Bond Company, on behalf of the defendant. The premium is 10% of the whole bond (example- the premium for a $10,000 bond is $1,000).

Property Bond

In rare cases, an individual may be released from custody by posting a property bond directly with the court. A piece of real estate that is situated in the county where the bond is set is required. The real estate usually has to be free and clear of any liens, mortgages, and encumbrances and the taxable value has to be 2-3 times the amount of the bond. Once the value of the property is verified by the clerk of court’s office, the court will then record a lien on the property to secure the full amount of bail. If the defendant subsequently fails to appear at the scheduled court dates, the court may initiate foreclosure proceedings against the property to obtain the forfeited bail amount. Should you need more information on Property bonds, we strongly suggest that you contact the Clerk of Court’s office directly as they are very involved.

Supersedeas Bond

A supersedeas bond, also known as a defendant's appeal bond, is a type of surety bond that a court requires from an appellant who wants to delay payment of a judgment until the appeal is over. An appellant's bond to stay execution on a judgment during the pendency of the appeal.

Surety bond

A surety bond (aka bail bond) is a written promissory note submitted to the court by the bonding company for the full face amount of the bond. This is done to secure the release of an accused party. A surety bond ensures that the accused will appear to all future court dates and abide by any and all other conditions imposed on them by the court for the full duration of their case.

Ten Percent (10%) Bond

A 10% percent bond is also posted directly with the court by the signer. An example of a ten percent bond would be, a bond amount of $10,000 would require $1,000 being paid to the court. After all the courts stipulations are met then up to 90% of the money may be returned to the signer.

BUYER BEWARE: Sometimes courts will apply bond money that was deposited with them to court costs, fines, fees etc. The court may or may not inform you of this.

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